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Some NZ managers lie their way to the top

13:30 AEST Mon Jun 25 2012
AAP
A survey has found 24 per cent of New Zealand managers have lied on their CV, worse than employees on average but better than Australian managers
A survey has found 24 per cent of New Zealand managers have lied on their CV, worse than employees on average but better than Australian managers (Getty)

Nearly a quarter of managers in New Zealand have lied on their CV, but they're more honest than their Australian counterparts, a study has found.

The survey conducted by Galaxy Research on behalf of recruitment company SHL found 24 per cent of managers have lied on their resume, compared to 14 per cent of all employees.

It found 15 per cent of managers made up or exaggerated their work experience, compared to 7 per cent of all employees, and 9 per cent changed information about how much they earned at their last job, compared to 5 per cent of all employees.

In addition, 6 per cent listed false qualifications (compared to 2 per cent generally).

The only number in which the population at large were more deceptive than managers was in getting a friend or partner to act as an employer referee: 3 per cent of all people did this, compared to 2 per cent of managers.

The researchers surveyed 410 New Zealanders aged 18 and over who were employed at the time.

The New Zealanders surveyed were on average either more honest in their CVs than Australians - or less willing to tell the researchers the truth.

The Australian survey found 39 per cent of managers lied on their CV, compared to 25 per cent of employees on the whole.

It found 18 per cent of managers made up or exaggerated their work experience, compared to 13 per cent of all employees, and 13 per cent of managers changed information about their earnings in their last job, compared to 6 per cent of all employees.

"In the current economic climate, job seekers are still trying to cover-up weaknesses in their resumes to appear more suitable for prospective roles. Employers need to remain vigilant," SHL Australia and New Zealand managing director Stephanie Christopher said.

"It's alarming to see that managers are the worst offenders for misrepresenting themselves to employers."